brain scans



inside the mind of dana, age 2 and 3/4
brain scan completed: november, 2019
archival pigment print 19”x19” 2018


inside the mind of cameron, age 4
brain scan completed: june, 2019
archival pigment print 19”x19” 2018


inside the mind of jamie, age 5 and 1/2
brain scan completed: april, 2019
archival pigment print 19”x19” 2018


inside the mind of pat, age 8 (months)
brain scan completed: january, 2019
archival pigment print 19”x19” 2018


inside the mind of sam, age 1
brain scan completed: march, 2019
archival pigment print 19”x19” 2018




2018, archival pigment prints 19”x19”
kizh and tongva land

these clippings were gathered from various national geographic magazines dating from the late 1960’s to the early 1970’s. patterns and repetition morphed into similar images which began to appear in the magazines that seemed to be replicated and lost the more the pages turned on each issue.

the final prints were made using scans of the magazines and digitally forcing together pages that had standalone intrigue. there is not much of a ruling to the layout except that it felt appropriate to put them together spontaneously (or as much as possible) as they were already admired from the magazines carefully.

they exist as squares to replicate the original square format of instagram, which seems to hold new interest for the upcoming generation whereas the previous national geographic generation enjoyed a life with little to no screens. the chaos of pattern and multiple images that come together to create one larger image that does not really tell the viewer much speaks to the images mindlessly scrolled through on instagram and on the internet in general. the ‘brain scans’ are of younger ages, who typically would not have access (or need) to such material on debut of the original national geographic magazines, but now do because of the availability of the internet. there is an impending doom of the nothing we fill our heads with at such an early age, and a general wonderment of why we still continue to do so.

the squares were made a few months before the date of each brain scan, to imply that this ‘future’ was not too far off.




Mark